Photo of Jacquelyn R. Daniel

Jacquelyn R. Daniel is an associate in the Corporate Department and a member of the Heath Care Group. Jacquelyn earned her B.A. in political science from the University of California Berkeley in 2015, and her J.D. from Boston College Law School in 2022. Before law school, Jacquelyn spent several years working in biomedical research administration at a premier Harvard teaching hospital in Boston, MA. During law school, Jacquelyn focused her studies and clinical practice on corporate law and health law. She also interned in-house for two large health care providers headquartered in the Boston area.

In August 2023, we published a blog post about the California Office of Health Care Access and Information’s (“OHCA”) proposed cost and market impact review (“CMIR”) regulations under the California Health Care Quality and Affordability Act (“Proposed Regulations”). The final CMIR regulations implementing the notice requirements for large health care transactions in California (“Final Regulations”) were approved on December 18, 2023. As enacted, all health care entities that meet certain threshold requirements and are a party to a “material change transaction” expected to close on or after April 1, 2024, must provide at least 90 days’ advance notice to OHCA. OHCA began accepting notices as of January 1.

Continuing the trend towards greater scrutiny of health care transactions, on February 16, the California Assembly introduced a new bill, AB-3129, which would subject private equity groups and hedge funds to a 90-day notice and consent requirement for change of control transactions or acquisitions of health care facilities or provider groups that are expected to close on or after January 1, 2025. While the Final Regulations are intended to promote competition in the health care sector, the stated purpose of AB‑3129 is to improve the quality and lower the cost of health care.

This blog discusses the scope of the Final Regulations and what to look out for as AB-3129 makes its way through the California legislative process. 

This year’s Health and Mental Hygiene Bill (“HMH Bill”) (part of the Governor’s FY 2025 Executive Budget, which proposes a $233 billion balanced budget), includes $35.5 billion to fund Medicaid, $4.8 billion to address serious mental illness and $6 billion in federal funding through the 1115 Waiver.

In addition to those provisions that look to extend current government programs, the HMH Bill proposes the following new initiatives:

Following New York State Governor Kathy Hochul’s proposal in February of this year (see our previous alert), the New York legislature passed and Governor Hochul signed a law on May 3, 2023, which significantly increases the state’s focus and visibility into physician practice management change‑of‑control transactions.[1] New York’s statute reflects a growing trend of states taking note of transactions that previously were not regulated by state administrative agencies. As we await the promulgation of regulations from the New York State Department of Health (“DOH”), we examine here how New York’s law compares to similar laws in other states, and describe precautions that operators in the physician management space — as well as those who do businesses with such operators — should take to safeguard themselves against major disruptions to operations.

On April 5, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) released the 2024 Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Benefit Programs Final Rule (“Final Rule”), which will be codified at 42 C.F.R. Parts 417, 422, 423, 455, and 460. The Final Rule adopts a host of reforms aimed at improving health care access, quality, and equity for Medicare beneficiaries that receive coverage through Part C (“Medicare Advantage” or “MA”) and prescription drug benefits through Part D. As discussed below, the Final Rule also has some notable omissions compared to what CMS previously proposed in December (“Proposed Rule,” published at 87 Fed. Reg. 79452 (2022)). The Final Rule is effective June 5, 2023.