On July 20, 2022, the Office of Inspector General for the Department of Health and Human Services (“OIG”) issued a special fraud alert (“Alert”) advising “practitioners to exercise caution when entering into arrangements with purported telemedicine companies.” The Alert is only one of four such “special fraud alerts” that the OIG has issued in the past decade and it illustrates the importance of OIG’s statements.

OIG Flags Seven Characteristics of Telehealth Fraud

In the Alert, OIG cautions that certain companies that purport to provide telehealth, telemedicine, or telemarketing services (collectively, “Telemedicine Companies”) have carried out fraudulent schemes by: (i) aggressively recruiting physicians and non-physician practitioners (collectively, “Providers”) and (ii) paying kickbacks to such Providers in exchange for the ordering of unnecessary items or services, including durable medical equipment, genetic testing, and other prescription items. According to OIG, the fraudulent schemes have varied in design and operation and involved a variety of individuals, Providers, and health care vendors, including call centers, staffing companies, and marketers.

Continue Reading OIG Issues Special Fraud Alert Regarding Telemedicine Arrangements

The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) has issued a formal request for information from the public about how regulated entities are implementing industry recognized security practices. The request for information represents a chance for the private sector to contribute to HHS regulation. Interested parties have until June 6, 2022 to submit comments.

HHS

In the last few years, we have seen an uptick in behavioral health groups focused on psychedelic treatments.  There are now at least five (5) psychedelic-assisted therapy platforms traded on NASDAQ with numerous others listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and elsewhere.[1]  Ketamine treatments, in particular, have garnered considerable attention from patients, providers and investors.   Treatment models range from more traditional psychotherapy and infusion services similar to those offered by Columbia University[2] to telemedicine-enabled psychotherapy coupled with mail-delivered tablets of ketamine under the Mindbloom model.[3]  However, despite the growth in adoption, Ketamine remains a controlled substance and ketamine behavioral health remains an industry with material regulatory risks.

We have set forth certain key considerations for various stakeholders involved with ketamine behavioral health.
Continue Reading Key Legal Considerations Relating to Ketamine Behavioral Health Platforms