Photo of Elizabeth (Betsy) Rosen Siegel

Elizabeth (Betsy) Rosen Siegel is an associate in the Health Care Department. Her practice focuses on representing health care clients, including hospitals, hospital systems, academic medical centers, physician organizations and other care entities. Betsy provides legal advice on a wide range of regulatory, transactional and corporate matters, including Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement, fraud and abuse compliance, managed care contracting, HIPAA and data privacy, and general corporate and business planning.

In addition, Betsy maintains an active pro bono practice, which includes representing individuals in various immigration matters and representing not-for-profit organizations on a variety of matters. Betsy also serves on the Her Justice Junior Advisory Board.

Betsy earned her J.D. from The George Washington University Law School in 2013, while also earning her graduate certificate in health policy from The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. While in law school, she worked as a health insurance counselor at the George Washington University Law Health Rights Law Clinic and was a member of the Public Contract Law Journal. Betsy also served as president of the Student Health Law Association and received the American Bar Association/Bureau of National Affairs Award given to the members of the graduating Juris Doctor class who have demonstrated excellence in the study of health law. Betsy received her B.S. in health care management and policy magna cum laude from Georgetown University in 2010.

The U.S. Department of Justice (the “DOJ”) recently settled whistleblower False Claims Act (“FCA”) allegations against The University of Miami (“UMiami”) for $22 million, which resolves claims from three separate lawsuits related to billing practices at UMiami’s off-campus hospital-based facilities (“Off-Campus Hospital Facilities”) and fraudulent claims for laboratory services.
Continue Reading The University of Miami to Pay $22 Million to Settle Medicare False Claims Act Allegations

In a prior blog post, we discussed CMS’ Hospital Price Transparency Rule at 45 C.F.R. § 180.10 et. seq., effective January 1, 2021 (the “Rule”), which requires hospitals to make public “a machine-readable file containing a list of all standard charges for all items and services.” Specifically, the Rule requires hospitals to post (1) a description of each item or service provided by the hospital; (2) the gross charge that applies to each individual item or service; (3) payer-specific negotiated rates that apply to each item or service for which a payer negotiated rate has been established. Each payer negotiated price must be clearly associated with the name of the applicable third-party payer and plan; (4) de-identified minimum negotiated rates that apply to each item or service; (5) de-identified maximum negotiated rates that apply to each item or service; (6) discounted cash prices that apply to each item or service; and (7) CPT, HCPCS, or other billing codes used by the hospital for purposes of accounting or billing for the item or service.

In a study published on March 16, 2021, Health Affairs found that out of the largest 100 hospitals in the U.S. (by certified bed count), 65 were “unambiguously noncompliant.” 12 of these 65 (18%) did not post any files or provided links to searchable databases that were not downloadable and 53 (82%) either did not include the payer-specific negotiated rates with the name of payer and plan clearly associated with the charges or were in some other way noncompliant. The data informing this study was pulled from late January 2021 to early February 2021.
Continue Reading Recent Study Shows Lack of Compliance With CMS’ Hospital Price Transparency Rule

As promised, this is a follow-up to our first blog post on the new federal transparency requirements. In our prior post, we summarized the Hospital Price Transparency rule which went into effect on January 1, 2021, and here we discuss the transparency rules contained in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (the “Act”), which apply to both health plans and health care providers.

Beginning January 1, 2022, the Act requires providers (individual practitioners and facilities) to send the health plan a “good faith estimated amount” of scheduled services, including any expected ancillary services and the expected billing and diagnostic codes for all items and services to be provided. This notice then triggers the health plan’s obligation to send enrollees an “Advanced Explanations of Benefits” (“AEOB”) prior to scheduled care (or upon patient request). If the patient is uninsured, the provider must send the notice directly to the patient.
Continue Reading New Federal Transparency Requirements Impacting Health Providers and Plans

This post is part one of two in a series on new transparency requirements impacting both health plans and health care providers.

In an effort to assist patients in understanding the cost of hospital services, the Hospital Price Transparency rule at 45 C.F.R. § 180.10 et. seq., effective January 1, 2021, requires all hospitals to make public the following pricing information:
Continue Reading The Hospital Price Transparency Rule: Is it Worth the Cost of Compliance?