In a prior blog post, we discussed CMS’ Hospital Price Transparency Rule at 45 C.F.R. § 180.10 et. seq., effective January 1, 2021 (the “Rule”), which requires hospitals to make public “a machine-readable file containing a list of all standard charges for all items and services.” Specifically, the Rule requires hospitals to post (1) a description of each item or service provided by the hospital; (2) the gross charge that applies to each individual item or service; (3) payer-specific negotiated rates that apply to each item or service for which a payer negotiated rate has been established. Each payer negotiated price must be clearly associated with the name of the applicable third-party payer and plan; (4) de-identified minimum negotiated rates that apply to each item or service; (5) de-identified maximum negotiated rates that apply to each item or service; (6) discounted cash prices that apply to each item or service; and (7) CPT, HCPCS, or other billing codes used by the hospital for purposes of accounting or billing for the item or service.

In a study published on March 16, 2021, Health Affairs found that out of the largest 100 hospitals in the U.S. (by certified bed count), 65 were “unambiguously noncompliant.” 12 of these 65 (18%) did not post any files or provided links to searchable databases that were not downloadable and 53 (82%) either did not include the payer-specific negotiated rates with the name of payer and plan clearly associated with the charges or were in some other way noncompliant. The data informing this study was pulled from late January 2021 to early February 2021.

This study was even referenced in an April 13, 2021 letter from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and its Subcommittee on Health (the “Committee”) to Secretary Becerra of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) whereby the Committee reported concern over the lack of compliance with the Rule and urged HHS to “revisit its enforcement tools, including the amount of the civil penalty [$300 per day (adjusted annually) or a maximum penalty of $109,500 per year], and to conduct regular audits of hospitals for compliance.”

Perhaps not coincidentally, CMS has begun to issue “Warning Notices” to hospitals deemed non-compliant, requiring full compliance within 90 days.  It is not clear whether notified hospitals are proceeding to comply.

As noted previously, the Rule is considered to be extremely burdensome and costly for hospitals. Critics have claimed, and there would appear little doubt, that CMS vastly underestimated the cost of compliance. While some argue that the costs to comply with the Rule far exceed any potential penalty for failure to comply, it is unlikely that CMS will tolerate long term and intentional non-compliance. We will be sure to stay informed and provide updates on any future developments.

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Photo of Edward S. Kornreich Edward S. Kornreich

Past long-standing chair of Proskauer’s Health Care Department, Ed Kornreich is a recognized authority on the legal, regulatory and business issues related to health care services.

Ed works primarily on health care transactions, regulatory compliance, health care payment and governance issues for varied…

Past long-standing chair of Proskauer’s Health Care Department, Ed Kornreich is a recognized authority on the legal, regulatory and business issues related to health care services.

Ed works primarily on health care transactions, regulatory compliance, health care payment and governance issues for varied providers (both for-profit and not-for-profit), vendors, GPOs, distributors and entrepreneurs. His approach combines sensitivity to meeting regulatory business goals with a comprehensive and realistic assessment of the health care environment, and he is particularly experienced in dealing with the complex issues related to integrated health care systems.

After working for the Legal Aid Society, Ed entered private practice, where he helped represent a major public hospital corporation in a series of reimbursement disputes with the state and federal governments, and counseled New York area hospitals and nursing homes on reimbursement and operational issues. Thereafter, Ed served as General Counsel of St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York. After leaving St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Ed joined Proskauer as a Partner in 1990.

Ed frequently writes and lectures on Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, health care integration, not-for-profit law and corporate governance issues, and the application of federal and state anti-kickback and “Stark” laws to health care transactions.

Photo of Elizabeth (Betsy) Rosen Siegel Elizabeth (Betsy) Rosen Siegel

Elizabeth (Betsy) Rosen Siegel is an associate in the Health Care Department. Her practice focuses on representing health care clients, including hospitals, hospital systems, academic medical centers, physician organizations and other care entities. Betsy provides legal advice on a wide range of regulatory…

Elizabeth (Betsy) Rosen Siegel is an associate in the Health Care Department. Her practice focuses on representing health care clients, including hospitals, hospital systems, academic medical centers, physician organizations and other care entities. Betsy provides legal advice on a wide range of regulatory, transactional and corporate matters, including Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement, fraud and abuse compliance, managed care contracting, HIPAA and data privacy, and general corporate and business planning.

In addition, Betsy maintains an active pro bono practice, which includes representing individuals in various immigration matters and representing not-for-profit organizations on a variety of matters. Betsy also serves on the Her Justice Junior Advisory Board.

Betsy earned her J.D. from The George Washington University Law School in 2013, while also earning her graduate certificate in health policy from The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. While in law school, she worked as a health insurance counselor at the George Washington University Law Health Rights Law Clinic and was a member of the Public Contract Law Journal. Betsy also served as president of the Student Health Law Association and received the American Bar Association/Bureau of National Affairs Award given to the members of the graduating Juris Doctor class who have demonstrated excellence in the study of health law. Betsy received her B.S. in health care management and policy magna cum laude from Georgetown University in 2010.